June 2018 Climate Science Round-Up

Our Climate Science Round-Ups are a compilation of recent news about climate science. In this edition, we pull articles from Nature, the BBC, and The Washington Post about weather trends in the US, plastic found in British mussels, and some key steps that individuals can take to reduce their impact on the earth. 

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April Climate Science Round-Up

In this month’s climate science round-up, we learn about the latest research on the effects of past deforestation on the climate, a mutant enzyme that can eat plastic, and why natural gas is not so clean after all. Read more

October Climate Science Roundup

Despite concerns that it might be blocked by the Trump administration, the Fourth National Climate Assessment report was recently released. This month’s climate science news is a mix of good and bad: peat bogs may be more resilient carbon sinks than we thought, forests can help us fight heat waves, and narwhals are helping us study glacier melt, but on the other hand, more glaciers may be at risk of melting and some climate scientists are facing gag orders from the government.

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September Climate Science News Roundup

What role did climate change play in recent catastrophic hurricanes? What’s going on in the Pacific Ocean? How can we tell what sea level looked like in the past? Find answers to these questions and more in this month’s climate science round-up.

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August Climate Science News Roundup

Hurricanes, fires, and drought, oh my! Deep into the summer, the evidence of climate change seems to be all around us. This month’s climate science round-up seeks to provide accurate and effective information so that we can work together to save our planet. Read more

Hurricane Harvey and the Future of Oregon’s Rural Counties

The beginning of the year’s above average precipitation began in the Southeast corner of the state in some of its most rural counties

Flooding in Oregon in early 2017 damaged many rural roads. Hurricane Harvey is expected to do the same in Texas; dumping an additional 1-3 feet of rain in the days after 2.5 feet of rain had already fallen in the first three days of the storm. Harvey previews future flood-problems for Oregon’s rural roads, while also lending  insight into how simple things such as simply being more careful with one another can save as many lives as rebuilding the physical infrastructure that connects us.

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Bangladesh In Devastating Climate Change-induced Flooding

Climate Change Induced Multiple Heavy Floods Hit the Same Areas During a Single Monsoon Season in Bangladesh

Written by Mukti Rahman, a 350PDX IREX Fellow during the fall of 2016. Mukti has since returned to her home country of Bangladesh, and continues to work to empower women in the work of ensuring access to clean drinking water as the sea levels rise and salinate the groundwater.  

credit: 350.org in Bangladesh

Due to heavy rainfall, this year people of Bangladesh have been affected by multiple heavy floods. Prolonged and successive devastating floods are being induced by climate change impact. Life has come to stand still & economic activities have been severely jeopardized. Around 25% of 160 million population of the country including major cities (Dhaka, Chittagong etc.) has been affected. Over thousands of villages have been inundated by this prolonged flooding, even several times each. Schools remain closed due to the devastation. Road and railway communication in many areas have been snapped. Access to medical facilities especially in the rural areas has become externally limited. People in the affected areas are in dire need of dry food, medical supplies, and fresh water. Access to adequate sanitation especially for women and children has become nearly impossible. Resulting in high proliferation of infectious water borne diseases like Diarrhoea, Hepatitis, Typhoid etc. Due to inundation of homesteads, many families have moved to higher land and living in makeshift shelters expose to elements of weather.

 

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The Political Science of a Solar Eclipse

Path of places in Oregon the total eclipse will be visible August 21, 2017

Solar irradiance on land is about 1000 watts per square meter at sea level on a clear day, like when the moon is not in the way. On the 21st of this month here in Oregon, solar irradiance is going to suddenly drop to about 1 watt per square meter in places like Salem, Warm Springs (momentarily not so warm), and Prineville. Weather will change for a bit, but climate will not. The solar eclipse will help some politicians escape the confusion between the two. Some will be left behind. Read more

July Climate Science News Roundup

Calving icebergs at both poles, eutrophication in our coastal ecosystems: more often than not, the current climate science can seem dire. But by arming ourselves with the most up-to-date science, we can be more effective in changing the culture around climate change. This month’s climate science round-up seeks to provide accurate and effective information so that we can work together to save our planet.

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June Climate Science News Roundup

It’s increasingly clear that action on climate change in the United States must happen at the local and grassroots level, rather than the federal level. With that in mind, it’s more important than ever that we stay up to date on developments in climate science. This month’s climate science round-up seeks to arm us all with accurate and effective information so that we can work together to save our planet.

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